Artists by Claire Farrell

 Dalziel+ Scullion,  Gold Leaf  (2011), Pooley Hall Colliery commissioned by Warwickshire County Council and HCA

Dalziel+ Scullion, Gold Leaf (2011), Pooley Hall Colliery commissioned by Warwickshire County Council and HCA

Dalziel & Scullion | Aberdeen

Matthew Dalziel and Louise Scullion are Scotland-based artists who work with sculpture, photography, film, video and sound to make artworks that distil and interpret Nature. Their public art works amplify specific aspects of the ecology of a place, offering audiences alternative perspectives and re-establishing connections with the natural world. Commissions include Catalyst (2008), Dundee City Council; Gold Leaf (2011) at Pooley Hall colliery, Warwickshire County Council and HCA; Rain (Thuwal) (2015), a pavilion dedicated to the phenomenon of rain at KAUST’s university campus, Saudi Arabia; and Rosnes Bench (2015) for Dumfries and Galloway Forest. Currently they are working on Corpus (2018), a permanent outdoor artwork for Cambridge University.

www.dalzielscullion.com







 


 Industry Of The Ordinary,  Trader Tourist Refugee  (2017). Morro Bay, California. 

Industry Of The Ordinary, Trader Tourist Refugee (2017). Morro Bay, California. 

Industry Of The Ordinary | Chicago

Through sculpture, text, photography, video and performance, Industry of the Ordinary (IOTO) are dedicated to an exploration and celebration of the customary, the everyday, and the usual. Their emphasis is on challenging pejorative notions of the ordinary and, in doing so, moving beyond the quotidian.

Making use of a variety of art-making strategies, IOTO have primarily been concerned with the dynamics and aesthetics of public and performative spaces. Drawing inspiration from Joseph Beuys’s theory of ‘social sculpture’ and the Situationists, IOTO have explored non-traditional sites for art works where accidental audiences can be found. Often collaborating with multiple members of the community, these works attempt to occupy and invigorate public thoroughfares. The work is intended to provoke and promote public discourse, to bring fine art out of the gallery or performing arts venue, and, without becoming didactic or pedantic, make it readily available to the non-art-trained audience.

www.industryoftheordinary.com


 Cathy Wade  For The Body For The Car  (2017)

Cathy Wade For The Body For The Car (2017)

Cathy Wade | Birmingham

Cathy Wade’s practice is formed within collaborative partnerships with others that focus on site and social document. Her practice work is performative, bendable and durational, it seeks to understand the experience of the present and is undertaken with others through walking, action or in conversation. Wade is invested in reading the environment that she inhabits and asking questions through practice and research as to how it functions, and what it communicates. Of specific interest to her is the relationship of the ‘feminine’ body to the vertical environment of the city. Artworks are the legacy of the projects she creates and evidence the process of their engagement, media includes:
digital video, print, installation, public art, posters, text, drawing, performance and participatory works.

Residencies & Fellowships include: Longbridge Public Art Project 2013-2017, Repeator at The Office for Art Design and Technology in 2017, Birmingham City University Wheatley Fellowship for 2015-2016 and Artist in Residence at Edible Eastside 2012-14. Publications include Delineator (2014), After Carl (2014) and As We Alter It (2017). She is the Course Leader for MA Arts in Education Practices at BCU.

www.cathywade.co.uk


 John Newling (2006-2007)  The Preston Market Mystery Project.  A commissioned project for  Preston Market Place that involves the staging of 3 live events within the market site. Harris Museum and Now Festival.

John Newling (2006-2007) The Preston Market Mystery Project. A commissioned project for  Preston Market Place that involves the staging of 3 live events within the market site. Harris Museum and Now Festival.

John Newling | Nottingham

John Newling was born in Birmingham in 1952 and has an acclaimed international reputation creating projects and installing works in the UK and many other countries.

He is a pioneer of public art with a social purpose. His works explore the natural world and the social and economic systems of society – such as money or religion. To this end Newling has innovated the possibilities and benefits for art in a renewed social and conceptual framework.  

www.john-newling.com



 


IanRichards_Bench_Ihopemyhusbanddiesfirst_2015 copy.jpg

Ian Richards | Birmingham

Ian Richards is a Birmingham based artist and designer with a practice spanning two decades exploring diverse mediums within the context of communication; often one way dialogue that mirrors traditional advertising techniques. Throughout Richards practice he has employed a range of mediums within the overarching context of communication and societal perceptions of homosexuality.

Recent work includes text and language sourced from specific communities and era specific advertising campaigns. Using processes of social engagement Richards explores society and culture with the aim of disrupting expectations and personalising mainstream narrative. The artist invites dialogue and interaction through the content, design and location of his work in public spaces.

www.heavyobject.com


 Emily Warner and Claire Hickey, commissioned by Jenny Peevers for  Re:connections  (2017)

Emily Warner and Claire Hickey, commissioned by Jenny Peevers for
Re:connections (2017)

Jenny Peevers | Birmingham

Jenny Peever's practice explores the interaction between art, people and place with a specific interest in exploring how arts practice can reflect and respond to the depth and complexity of people’s associations with their lived places. Rooted in site specific and socially engaged arts practice, she integrates the disciplines of urban design and human geography.

Re:connections is a recent project Jenny produced, exploring residents emotional responses to where they live through dialogical arts practice. Located in an inner city neighbourhood in Birmingham, physically transformed through regeneration, the artists Justin Wiggan, Dan Burwood, Jess May Davies, Claire Hickey and Emily Warner were commissioned to engage residents. Art works produced as a response to observations and conversations with residents were presented at a picnic event in the local park and also formed part of an exhibition at Parkside Gallery, BCU.

Jenny is an executive director of Creative Health (Arts and Health) CIC and currently a part-time PhD researcher within the School of Architecture and Design, Birmingham City University. She is also a RSA fellow and a member of the national Art and Place working group (part of the Place Alliance movement).

www.jennypeevers.co.uk

Repository by Claire Farrell

Is it Artwashing? A reflexive approach would help artists answer.

Jenny Peevers

As someone involved in socially engaged, site specific arts practice, it’s impossible not to be aware of a term that has entered into arts discourse: artwashing. I’ve recently been involved in conversations and debates where artists and producers question whether or not the term describes what they’re unwittingly involved in doing…I’ve questioned myself...

Read the full essay here.



Instagram by Claire Farrell